Impact of Inflation Reduction Act Results in Lower Health Care Costs for Women, New Data Reveals

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TL/DR –

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) has released research showing that provisions from the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) will lower costs for women with Medicare. The data indicate that 733,000 women with Medicare would have saved money in 2020 if the IRA’s $35 cap on cost sharing for Medicare-covered insulin had been in place, and approximately two million women received recommended vaccines with zero cost sharing in 2021. The study also projects that about 857,000 women enrolled in Part D will save $1,000 or more in 2025 as a result of the IRA’s redesign of the prescription drug program’s structure.


ASPE releases findings on how IRA provisions can reduce health costs for women

The US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) published research about the positive impacts of the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) provisions on women enrolled in Medicare–including nearly 30 million women on Part D.

The research highlighted that if the IRA’s $35 cap on Medicare-covered insulin was applied in 2020, approximately 733,000 women would have benefited. In 2021, around two million women on Medicare received recommended zero cost-sharing vaccines. Furthermore, it’s projected that around 857,000 women under Part D could save $1,000 or more by 2025 due to IRA’s redesign of the prescription drug program.

ASPE’s Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Rebecca Haffajee, stated that their research revealed that women, especially those with autoimmune disorders, were more likely to be Medicare Part D enrollees. Thus, the reduction in drug costs could significantly benefit this demographic.

Considering that women form over half of the total Medicare enrollees, affordable health care access is critical. At Medicare Rights, efforts are ongoing to improve care and coverage for older adults, people with disabilities, and their families.

See the full report here.

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